Rome

Roman furniture was based heavily on Greek furniture, in style and construction. In the last few centuries Rome gradually superseded Greece as the foremost culture of Europe, leading eventually to Greece becoming a province of Rome in 146 BC.

Rome thus took over production and distribution of Greek furniture, and the boundary between the two is blurred.

The Romans did have some limited innovation outside of Greek influence, and styles distinctly their own.

Roman furniture was constructed principally using wood, metal and stone, with marble and limestone used for outside furniture. Very little wooden furniture survives intact, but there is evidence that a variety of woods were used, including maple, citron, beech, oak, and holly.

Some imported wood such as satinwood was used for decoration.

The most commonly used metal was bronze, of which numerous examples have survived, for example headrests for couches and metal stools.[40] Similar to the Greeks, Romans used tenons, dowels, nails, and glue to join wooden pieces together, and also practised veneering.

The 1738 and 1748 excavations of Herculaneum and Pompeii revealed Roman furniture, preserved in the ashes of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, to the eighteenth century.

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